UK Biobank’s Data Sharing Raises Alarm Bells

An investigation by The Observer has uncovered that the UK Biobank, a repository of health data from half a million UK citizens, has been sharing information with insurance companies. This development contravenes the Biobank’s initial pledge to keep this sensitive data out of the hands of insurers, a promise that was instrumental in garnering public trust at the outset. UK Biobank has since come out and responded to the article calling it “disingenuous” and “extremely misleading”. 

A Promise Made, Then Modified 

The UK Biobank was set up in 2006 as a goldmine for scientific discovery, offering researchers access to a treasure trove of biological samples and associated health data. With costs for access set between £3,000 and £9,000, the research derived from this data has been nothing short of revolutionary. However, the foundations of this scientific jewel are now being questioned. 

When the project was first announced, clear assurances were given that data would not be made available to insurance companies, mitigating fears that genetic predispositions could be used discriminatorily in insurance assessments. These assurances appeared in the Biobank’s FAQs and were echoed in parliamentary discussions. 

Changing Terms Amidst Grey Areas 

The Biobank contends that while it does strictly regulate data access, allowing only verified researchers to delve into its database, this includes commercial entities such as insurance firms if the research is deemed to be in the public interest. The boundaries of what constitutes “health-related” and “public interest” are now under scrutiny.   

However, according to the Observer investigation, evidence suggests that this nuance—commercial entities conducting health-related research—was not clearly communicated to participants, especially given the categorical assurances given previously although the UK Biobank categorically denies this and shared its consent form and information leaflet. 

Data Sharing: The Ethical Quandary 

This breach of the original promise has raised the ire of experts in genetics and data privacy, with Prof Yves Moreau highlighting the severity of the breach of trust. The concern is not just about the sharing of data but about the integrity of consent given by participants. The Biobank’s response indicates that the commitments made were outdated and that the current policy, which includes sharing anonymised data for health-related research, was made clear to participants upon enrolment. 

The Ripple Effect of Biobank’s Data Policies 

Further complicating matters is the nature of the companies granted access. Among them are ReMark International, a global insurance consultancy, Lydia.ai, a Canadian “insurtech” firm that wants to give people “personalised and predictive health scores”, and Club Vita, a longevity data analytics company. These companies have utilised Biobank data for projects ranging from disease prediction algorithms to assessing longevity risk factors. The question that is raised is how can one ensure that this is in fact in the Public Interest, do we take a commercial entities word for this? UK Biobank says all research conducted is “consistent with being health-related and in the public interest” and it has an expert data access committee who decide on any complex issues but the who checks the ethics of the ethics committee? The issues with this self-regulation are axiomatic. 

The Fallout and the Future 

This situation has led to a broader conversation about the ethical use of volunteered health data and the responsibility of custodians like the UK Biobank to uphold public trust. As technology evolves and the appetite for data grows across industries, the mechanisms of consent and transparency may need to be revisited.  The Information Commissioner’s Office is now considering the case, spotlighting the crucial need for clarity and accuracy in how organisations manage and utilise sensitive personal information. 

As the UK Biobank navigates these turbulent waters, the focus shifts to how institutions like it can maintain the delicate balance between facilitating scientific progress and safeguarding the privacy rights of individuals who contribute their personal data for the greater good. For the UK Biobank, regaining the trust of its participants and the public is now an urgent task, one that will require more than just a careful review of policies but a reaffirmation of its commitment to ethical stewardship of the data entrusted to it. 

Take a look at our highly popular Data Ethics Course. Places fill up fast so if you would like learn more in this fascinating area, book your place now. 

Author: actnowtraining

Act Now Training is Europe's leading provider of information governance training, serving government agencies, multinational corporations, financial institutions, and corporate law firms. Our associates have decades of information governance experience. We pride ourselves on delivering high quality training that is practical and makes the complex simple. Our extensive programme ranges from short webinars and one day workshops through to higher level practitioner certificate courses delivered online or in the classroom.

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